Tag Archives: TV

24 HOURS OF OBLIVION XVII

Any TV anchor who interviews Trump needs to print this out and commit it to memory.

TV in loving memory: Rasheed Hassan Khan devoted life to rights of peasants.

Water has memory. Ganga is carrying impressions, feelings, memories . . . She is a living entity. Rivers have rights.

One of the most brutal knockouts in recent memory. Let’s have no more of these daft catchweight fights!

Make me an option, and I’ll make you a memory.

New 5.5 Comfort 3” Twin Memory Foam Mattress Topper.

Time to sleep . . . (cue marching band, mother’s disapproving voice, and the memory of women who never wanted you).

Looks like the house of memory here.

Funny how the hours stretch, melt away my empathy. Persistence of a memory.

That’s just how I was brought up. Your girl should never touch a door or walk in a room behind you. It’s muscle memory now.

In loving memory of Johnny Depp. He ain’t dead, I just love remembering him.

Study without desire spoils the memory, and it retains nothing that it takes in.

Good luck getting the memory of people laughing at you dislodged from your brain.

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

PUTIN AND NOSTALGIA

The year 1968, when Soviet tanks marched into Prague, was a watershed. By the 1970s the revolutionary cosmic mission was forgotten by the Soviet leaders themselves. As the thaw was followed by stagnation, nostalgia returned. Brezhnev’s and Andropov’s era of the cold war remains a contested ground: for some it’s the time of stability and better living standards, for others, the time of official corruption, widespread cynicism, degradation of ideology and development of elite networks and clans. In 1968 high school student Vladimir Putin, inspired by a popular TV series “The Sword and the Sheild,” about Soviet agents working in Nazi Germany, went to the KGB office in Leningrad and offered his services. Thirty years later the president of Russia would remember this story with great affection, remaining faithful to the dreams of his youth. It is in this late Soviet era that one could find clues for the future development of Russian leadership. It seems that 1990s nostalgia for the Brezhnev era was partially based on the old Soviet movies that reappeared on Russian TV at that time. Many Russian viewers, tired of upheavals and lost illusions of the post-Soviet decade, tuned in and suddenly began to believe that Soviet life resembled those movies, forgetting their own experiences as well as their ways of watching those films twenty years earlier – with much more skepticism and double entendre.

– Svetlana Boym, The Future of Nostalgia

Tagged , , , , , , , , , ,